TOR Relay

Eigenes TOR Relay – Wie und wieso?

Hallo! Heute möchte euch mal zeigen, wie ihr auf eurem Server ein eigenes TOR Relay hosten könnt und was das überhaupt ist.

Was ist ein TOR Relay?

Bei einer Verbindung mit dem TOR Netzwerk, wird eure Verbindung durch das TOR Netzwerk verschlüsselt, verschleiert und somit anonymisiert. Zur Verbindung mit dem TOR Netzwerk wird meistens der TOR Browser eingesetzt.

Eine Standard Verbindung im TOR Netzwerk besteht immer aus 3 Knoten, einem Entry Node, bis zu 3 Middle Nodes (darum geht es hier heute) und einem Exit Node.

Der Entry Node bildet den Einsteig ins Netzwerk und etabliert die Verbindung, das Middle Relay leitet eure Anfragen einfach nur zum Exit Node weiter und verschleiert diese durch den weiteren Hop zusätlich. Der Exit Node bringt die Verbindung am Ende ans Ziel.

Ich möchte euch an dieser Stelle empfehlen, keine Exits an eurem Node zu erlauben, da die IP eines Exit Nodes letztendlich die ist, die in den Webserver-Logs der jeweiligen Webseite auftaucht. Da nicht alles an Traffic im TOR Netzwerk ganz legal ist, ist die IP dieses Exits Node grundsätzlich erstmal der „Hauptverdächtige“ für die durchgeführte Aktivität.

Wieso ein TOR Relay hosten?

Wir leben in einer Zeit, in der Anonymität ein immer wichtigeres Thema wird und ein TOR Relay zu hosten, ist eine gute Möglichkeit um für mehr Anonymität zu sorgen. Das TOR Netzwerk basiert komplett auf freiwillige Nutzer die Relays hosten.

Advancing human rights and defending your privacy & anonymity online through free software and open networks. – TOR

Außerdem habt ihr keinen Nachteil dadurch ein Relay zu hosten. Wenn ihr sowieso schon im Besitz eines Servers seid, werdet ihr sicherlich keinen Nachteil haben, weil eine kleine leichtgewichtige Software mit 200kbyte/s ein paar Pakete durch euren Server schubst.

Wie hoste ich ein TOR Relay?

Ich werde hier heute nur die Installation auf einem Linux System beschreiben, in meinem Fall ist das ein Debian 9 System.

Unter Windows ist das ganze soweit ich weiß noch deutlich simpler, soweit ich informiert bin, gibt es dort direkt im Launcher des TOR Browsers die Möglichkeit, ein Relay einzurichten.

Also, los gehts!

Zuerst installieren wir das ganze mit

apt install tor

Danach stoppen wir TOR erst einmal, damit wird in Ruhe die Konfiguration anpassen können.
Hierzu öffnen wir die TOR Konfiguration, ich nutze hierfür den Editor „nano“. Bitte beachtet, dass die Datei mit Root-Rechten geöffnet werden muss. Also entweder direkt mit dem root Nutzer öffnen, oder mit sudo.

sudo nano /etc/tor/torrc

Hier fügt ihr nun folgenden Code ein:

## Configuration file for a typical Tor user
## Last updated 22 September 2015 for Tor 0.2.7.3-alpha.
## (may or may not work for much older or much newer versions of Tor.)
##
## Lines that begin with "## " try to explain what's going on. Lines
## that begin with just "#" are disabled commands: you can enable them
## by removing the "#" symbol.
##
## See 'man tor', or https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-manual.html,
## for more options you can use in this file.
##
## Tor will look for this file in various places based on your platform:
## https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq#torrc

## Tor opens a SOCKS proxy on port 9050 by default -- even if you don't
## configure one below. Set "SOCKSPort 0" if you plan to run Tor only
## as a relay, and not make any local application connections yourself.
#SOCKSPort 9050 # Default: Bind to localhost:9050 for local connections.
#SOCKSPort 192.168.0.1:9100 # Bind to this address:port too.

## Entry policies to allow/deny SOCKS requests based on IP address.
## First entry that matches wins. If no SOCKSPolicy is set, we accept
## all (and only) requests that reach a SOCKSPort. Untrusted users who
## can access your SOCKSPort may be able to learn about the connections
## you make.
#SOCKSPolicy accept 192.168.0.0/16
#SOCKSPolicy accept6 FC00::/7
#SOCKSPolicy reject *

## Logs go to stdout at level "notice" unless redirected by something
## else, like one of the below lines. You can have as many Log lines as
## you want.
##
## We advise using "notice" in most cases, since anything more verbose
## may provide sensitive information to an attacker who obtains the logs.
##
## Send all messages of level 'notice' or higher to /var/log/tor/notices.log
#Log notice file /var/log/tor/notices.log
## Send every possible message to /var/log/tor/debug.log
#Log debug file /var/log/tor/debug.log
## Use the system log instead of Tor's logfiles
#Log notice syslog
## To send all messages to stderr:
#Log debug stderr

## Uncomment this to start the process in the background... or use
## --runasdaemon 1 on the command line. This is ignored on Windows;
## see the FAQ entry if you want Tor to run as an NT service.
RunAsDaemon 1

## The directory for keeping all the keys/etc. By default, we store
## things in $HOME/.tor on Unix, and in Application Data\tor on Windows.
#DataDirectory /var/lib/tor

## The port on which Tor will listen for local connections from Tor
## controller applications, as documented in control-spec.txt.
ControlPort 9051
## If you enable the controlport, be sure to enable one of these
## authentication methods, to prevent attackers from accessing it.
#HashedControlPassword 16:872860B76453A77D60CA2BB8C1A7042072093276A3D701AD684053EC4C
#CookieAuthentication 1

############### This section is just for location-hidden services ###

## Once you have configured a hidden service, you can look at the
## contents of the file ".../hidden_service/hostname" for the address
## to tell people.
##
## HiddenServicePort x y:z says to redirect requests on port x to the
## address y:z.

#HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/hidden_service/
#HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:80

#HiddenServiceDir /var/lib/tor/other_hidden_service/
#HiddenServicePort 80 127.0.0.1:80
#HiddenServicePort 22 127.0.0.1:22

################ This section is just for relays #####################
#
## See https://www.torproject.org/docs/tor-doc-relay for details.

## Required: what port to advertise for incoming Tor connections.
ORPort 9001
## If you want to listen on a port other than the one advertised in
## ORPort (e.g. to advertise 443 but bind to 9090), you can do it as
## follows. You'll need to do ipchains or other port forwarding
## yourself to make this work.
#ORPort 443 NoListen
#ORPort 127.0.0.1:9090 NoAdvertise

## The IP address or full DNS name for incoming connections to your
## relay. Leave commented out and Tor will guess.
#Address noname.example.com

## If you have multiple network interfaces, you can specify one for
## outgoing traffic to use.
# OutboundBindAddress 10.0.0.5

## A handle for your relay, so people don't have to refer to it by key.
## Nicknames must be between 1 and 19 characters inclusive, and must
## contain only the characters [a-zA-Z0-9].
Nickname HierTragtIhrEurenGewünschtenRelayNamenEin

## Define these to limit how much relayed traffic you will allow. Your
## own traffic is still unthrottled. Note that RelayBandwidthRate must
## be at least 75 kilobytes per second.
## Note that units for these config options are bytes (per second), not
## bits (per second), and that prefixes are binary prefixes, i.e. 2^10,
## 2^20, etc.
RelayBandwidthRate 1 MB
RelayBandwidthBurst 1 MB

## Use these to restrict the maximum traffic per day, week, or month.
## Note that this threshold applies separately to sent and received bytes,
## not to their sum: setting "40 GB" may allow up to 80 GB total before
## hibernating.
##
## Set a maximum of 40 gigabytes each way per period.
AccountingMax 10 GBytes
## Each period starts daily at midnight (AccountingMax is per day)
AccountingStart day 00:00
## Each period starts on the 3rd of the month at 15:00 (AccountingMax
## is per month)
#AccountingStart month 3 15:00

## Administrative contact information for this relay or bridge. This line
## can be used to contact you if your relay or bridge is misconfigured or
## something else goes wrong. Note that we archive and publish all
## descriptors containing these lines and that Google indexes them, so
## spammers might also collect them. You may want to obscure the fact that
## it's an email address and/or generate a new address for this purpose.
ContactInfo DeinName <TrageHierEineEMailAdresseEin@UnterDerDuZuErreichen.Bist
## You might also include your PGP or GPG fingerprint if you have one:
#ContactInfo 0xFFFFFFFF Random Person

## Uncomment this to mirror directory information for others. Please do
## if you have enough bandwidth.
#DirPort 9030 # what port to advertise for directory connections
## If you want to listen on a port other than the one advertised in
## DirPort (e.g. to advertise 80 but bind to 9091), you can do it as
## follows. below too. You'll need to do ipchains or other port
## forwarding yourself to make this work.
#DirPort 80 NoListen
#DirPort 127.0.0.1:9091 NoAdvertise
## Uncomment to return an arbitrary blob of html on your DirPort. Now you
## can explain what Tor is if anybody wonders why your IP address is
## contacting them. See contrib/tor-exit-notice.html in Tor's source
## distribution for a sample.
#DirPortFrontPage /etc/tor/tor-exit-notice.html

## Uncomment this if you run more than one Tor relay, and add the identity
## key fingerprint of each Tor relay you control, even if they're on
## different networks. You declare it here so Tor clients can avoid
## using more than one of your relays in a single circuit. See
## https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq#MultipleRelays
## However, you should never include a bridge's fingerprint here, as it would
## break its concealability and potentially reveal its IP/TCP address.
#MyFamily $keyid,$keyid,...

## A comma-separated list of exit policies. They're considered first
## to last, and the first match wins.
##
## If you want to allow the same ports on IPv4 and IPv6, write your rules
## using accept/reject *. If you want to allow different ports on IPv4 and
## IPv6, write your IPv6 rules using accept6/reject6 *6, and your IPv4 rules
## using accept/reject *4.
##
## If you want to _replace_ the default exit policy, end this with either a
## reject *:* or an accept *:*. Otherwise, you're _augmenting_ (prepending to)
## the default exit policy. Leave commented to just use the default, which is
## described in the man page or at
## https://www.torproject.org/documentation.html
##
## Look at https://www.torproject.org/faq-abuse.html#TypicalAbuses
## for issues you might encounter if you use the default exit policy.
##
## If certain IPs and ports are blocked externally, e.g. by your firewall,
## you should update your exit policy to reflect this -- otherwise Tor
## users will be told that those destinations are down.
##
## For security, by default Tor rejects connections to private (local)
## networks, including to the configured primary public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses,
## and any public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses on any interface on the relay.
## See the man page entry for ExitPolicyRejectPrivate if you want to allow
## "exit enclaving".
##
#ExitPolicy accept *:6660-6667,reject *:* # allow irc ports on IPv4 and IPv6 but no more
#ExitPolicy accept *:119 # accept nntp ports on IPv4 and IPv6 as well as default exit policy
#ExitPolicy accept *4:119 # accept nntp ports on IPv4 only as well as default exit policy
#ExitPolicy accept6 *6:119 # accept nntp ports on IPv6 only as well as default exit policy
ExitPolicy reject *:* # no exits allowed

## Bridge relays (or "bridges") are Tor relays that aren't listed in the
## main directory. Since there is no complete public list of them, even an
## ISP that filters connections to all the known Tor relays probably
## won't be able to block all the bridges. Also, websites won't treat you
## differently because they won't know you're running Tor. If you can
## be a real relay, please do; but if not, be a bridge!
BridgeRelay 0
## By default, Tor will advertise your bridge to users through various
## mechanisms like https://bridges.torproject.org/. If you want to run
## a private bridge, for example because you'll give out your bridge
## address manually to your friends, uncomment this line:
#PublishServerDescriptor 0

DisableDebuggerAttachment 0

Diese Konfiguration konfiguriert ein Relay, welches auf Port 9001 (Standard OR Port) läuft, alle 24 Stunden 10GB Traffic mit maximal 1MB/s nutzen darf und keine Exits erlaubt.

Es gibt dort allerdings ein paar Zeilen, die ihr anpassen könnt/müsst. Ihr müsst dazu, die unten angegebenen Zeilen in der Datei anpassen. Diese lassen sich in nano zum Beispiel per STRG + W suchen.

# Dort solltet ihr einen super coolen Namen für euer Relay angeben
Nickname HierTragtIhrEurenGewünschtenRelayNamenEin

# Dort solltet ihr eine E-Mail Adresse und euren Namen/Synonym eintragen, falls es Probleme geben sollte, kann man euch dort kontaktieren
ContactInfo DeinName <TrageHierEineEMailAdresseEin@UnterDerDuZuErreichen.BistEin>

# Damit könnt ihr festlegen, wie viel Bandbreite das Relay maximal nutzen darf. Hier können auch KB usw. genutzt werden.
RelayBandwidthRate 1 MB
RelayBandwidthBurst 1 MB

# Damit könnt ihr festlegen, wie viel Traffic das Relay im festgelegten Zeitraum nutzen darf. Wird dieses Maximum überschritten, wird das Relay bis zum nächsten Zeitraum pausiert.
AccountingMax 10 GBytes

# Damit könnt ihr den genutzen Zeitraum festlegen. Aktuell ist das Relay so konfiguriert, dass sich die Statistik alle 24h zurücksetzt. Somit können aktuell 10GB/24h genutzt werden.
## Each period starts daily at midnight (AccountingMax is per day)
AccountingStart day 00:00
## Each period starts on the 3rd of the month at 15:00 (AccountingMax
## is per month)
#AccountingStart month 3 15:00

Ihr könnt euer Relay nun wieder starten.

service tor start

Wenn der Start reibungslos verläuft, solltet ihr nach ein paar Minuten mal in den TOR Log schauen. Diese Datei lässt sich nur öffnen, wenn man direkt als root Nutzer angemeldet ist, sudo funktioniert hierbei nicht.

nano /var/log/tor/log

Dort werdet ihr erfahren, ob euer Relay erfolgreich von Außen erreicht werden konnte. Ist dies der Fall, läuft soweit alles.
In den ersten Stunden/Tagen wird das Relay keinen bis kaum Traffic erzeugen, bis das Relay aktiv genutzt wird, dauert es ein bisschen.
Im TOR Atlas könnt ihr, mit dem Namen eures TOR Relays, die aktuellen Statistiken zu diesem sehen.

Ich hoffe, dass euch diese kleine Anleitung gefallen hat! Sollte irgendetwas bei euch nicht funktionieren, könnt ihr euch gerne in den Kommentaren melden. Ich werde dann versuchen, euch zu helfen.
Bis zum nächsten Mal!

Letzter Beitrag: http://lennartobst.de/allgemeines/neues-design-neuer-server